Chinese clinical descriptions of pain and what they mean

Aching pain – suan tong 酸痛 -a sign of deficiency, usually of qi  and blood, or damp or cold -generally not severe and accompanied by weakness, soreness, lightness, or emptiness in the affected area -often relieved by pressure and rubbing -often in the low back and where there are a lot of soft muscles Distending pain – Read more…

Sun Si Miao On Healing

“The fools of the world study formulas for three years and yet it is said [of them] that there is not a single disease under heaven that they are able to treat. After treating disease for three years, they finally become aware that no formula under heaven exists that they are able to use. For Read more…

Art Of Life Through The Four Seasons

Through observation of the world the early Chinese drew analogies between natural occurrences and processes in the body. They began to articulate a system of medicine based on these observations. The Huang Di Nei Jing – literally, Huang Di’s Internal Classic, is one of the oldest and most influential Chinese medical texts. Ascribed to the Read more…

A physician becomes perfect …

A physician becomes perfect in the waves of change. Adherence to rigid principles will only create stagnation. Every wanderer on the path of medicine necessarily looks to the laws of nature expounded by the masters of old, but when the moment of action arrives, s/he must receive the transmission of the heart and become enlightened Read more…

Medicine is

Medicine is a combination of fixed principles and their flexible usage that makes them come alive in the magic of the moment. The former transmits the truth of the ages, while the latter follows the subtle dynamics of time. Both of them need to be adhered to. Sun Zhixiong (Ming dynasty) trans. H. Fruehauf